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Wind Horse and Four Protective Animals with Eight Auspicious Emblems by BabelStone on Flickr.Via Flickr:
5.3 × 5.4 cm.
Paper.
Lhasa, 1986.

Wind Horse and Four Protective Animals with Eight Auspicious Emblems by BabelStone on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
5.3 × 5.4 cm.
Paper.
Lhasa, 1986.

animals in the sky by amaah on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Animals climb up to the sky with the aid of a rope.
Scene from the Igbo folktale, A fight in the sky, as recounted by Rems Nna Umeasiegbu in The Way We Live

animals in the sky by amaah on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Animals climb up to the sky with the aid of a rope.

Scene from the Igbo folktale, A fight in the sky, as recounted by Rems Nna Umeasiegbu in The Way We Live

Animals Are Outside Today by Colleen Plumb | Opening Reception Shots by Jen Bekman on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Opening Reception Shots of Animals Are Outside Today by Colleen Plumb
On view March 12 – April 24, 2011 at Jen Bekman Gallery.
Drop a note to sales AT jenbekman DOT com to inquire about pricing.
Photographs ©Elizabeth Leitzell, 2010

Animals Are Outside Today by Colleen Plumb | Opening Reception Shots by Jen Bekman on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Opening Reception Shots of Animals Are Outside Today by Colleen Plumb

On view March 12 – April 24, 2011 at Jen Bekman Gallery.

Drop a note to sales AT jenbekman DOT com to inquire about pricing.

Photographs ©Elizabeth Leitzell, 2010

Gorilla Baby Hug Party by Evan Animals on Flickr.Via Flickr:
2 baby Gorillas at the Bronx Zoo hug it out after a game of tag around the fallen tree stump.
more photos of Baby Animals at doazoo.com

Gorilla Baby Hug Party by Evan Animals on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
2 baby Gorillas at the Bronx Zoo hug it out after a game of tag around the fallen tree stump.

more photos of Baby Animals at doazoo.com

animals in a tree by joanneliuyunn on Flickr.Via Flickr:
available as a print here! joanneliu.society6.com/store
check out my shop!www.cafepress.com/joannesjunk

animals in a tree by joanneliuyunn on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
available as a print here!
joanneliu.society6.com/store


check out my shop!
www.cafepress.com/joannesjunk

fierce.animals by annamariahorner on Flickr.Via Flickr:blogged

fierce.animals by annamariahorner on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
blogged

Liquid Animals by jciv on Flickr.Via Flickr:
What do you see?(Explore: 174 on Saturday, March 24, 2007)

Liquid Animals by jciv on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
What do you see?

(Explore: 174 on Saturday, March 24, 2007)

Sea Lions Hugging by Evan Animals on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Two Sea Lions Hug it out.  They were playing a lot and putting on a show!  These two were photographed at the National Zoo in DC.  Scroll below for more photos of the two!

Sea Lions Hugging by Evan Animals on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Two Sea Lions Hug it out. They were playing a lot and putting on a show! These two were photographed at the National Zoo in DC. Scroll below for more photos of the two!

Save the wild animals poster by Chazynash on Flickr.
Kilimanjaro Safaris by Imagineering My Way on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Kilimanjaro Safaris is a safari attraction at Disney’s Animal Kingdom on the Walt Disney World Resort property in Lake Buena Vista, Florida. It simulates an open-sided safari ride through the savanna of East Africa.
Kilimanjaro Safaris typically operates until sundown. However, during the holiday season of 1998, the safaris were continued at night and dubbed Kilimanjaro Night Safaris. Though many animals were asleep, or unable to be seen at night, the attraction had a completely different script and storyline. This “new” attraction featured additional animal sounds, reflectors hidden in the foliage to resemble animals’ eyes, and an actual African dance troup, who performed around a bonfire in the area normally occupied by the attraction’s elephants. Kilimanjaro Night Safaris only ran during that initial holiday season. After this time, it was deemed that the additional costs, plus the fact that animal visibility was poor (eliciting many guest complaints), made Night Safaris unfeasible to continue regularly.
In 2004, much of the savanna’s drainage system had to be replaced. The attraction remained open during the rehab, with green tarps covering the construction sites to keep the animals out.
In 2007-9, the trucks were extended with an extra row of seating, allowing for more capacity. Also, the safari script/story, along with the Wilson/Jobson story has significantly changed. There is less of a story about “Little Red”, and more about the animals in the Reserve and the need to find a lost elephant at the end. This led to a somewhat confused plot in which guests are searching for a lost “mother elephant” and eventually find her baby which, according to the story, had already been safe the whole time.
The ride originally featured a cast member in the role of a gun-toting reserve warden who captured the poachers and saved Big Red and Little Red. This element of the attraction was eventually eliminated. During Cast Previews of Disney’s Animal Kingdom, there was a “Dark Ending” in which the safari vehicle encountered the slaughtered corpse of Big Red. This scene proved too shocking for families and children, and thus was eventually changed to give the attraction a happier ending.
Long before the safari or even Walt Disney World opened, Walt Disney wanted to use real African animals for the river attraction Jungle Cruise at Disneyland. However, due to several reasons, Audio-Animatronics replicas were placed instead.
In July of 2010 it was announced that guests will soon be able to go on “guided treks” around the savannah. This will include areas that are not part of the regular ride experience.

Kilimanjaro Safaris by Imagineering My Way on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Kilimanjaro Safaris is a safari attraction at Disney’s Animal Kingdom on the Walt Disney World Resort property in Lake Buena Vista, Florida. It simulates an open-sided safari ride through the savanna of East Africa.

Kilimanjaro Safaris typically operates until sundown. However, during the holiday season of 1998, the safaris were continued at night and dubbed Kilimanjaro Night Safaris. Though many animals were asleep, or unable to be seen at night, the attraction had a completely different script and storyline. This “new” attraction featured additional animal sounds, reflectors hidden in the foliage to resemble animals’ eyes, and an actual African dance troup, who performed around a bonfire in the area normally occupied by the attraction’s elephants. Kilimanjaro Night Safaris only ran during that initial holiday season. After this time, it was deemed that the additional costs, plus the fact that animal visibility was poor (eliciting many guest complaints), made Night Safaris unfeasible to continue regularly.

In 2004, much of the savanna’s drainage system had to be replaced. The attraction remained open during the rehab, with green tarps covering the construction sites to keep the animals out.

In 2007-9, the trucks were extended with an extra row of seating, allowing for more capacity. Also, the safari script/story, along with the Wilson/Jobson story has significantly changed. There is less of a story about “Little Red”, and more about the animals in the Reserve and the need to find a lost elephant at the end. This led to a somewhat confused plot in which guests are searching for a lost “mother elephant” and eventually find her baby which, according to the story, had already been safe the whole time.

The ride originally featured a cast member in the role of a gun-toting reserve warden who captured the poachers and saved Big Red and Little Red. This element of the attraction was eventually eliminated. During Cast Previews of Disney’s Animal Kingdom, there was a “Dark Ending” in which the safari vehicle encountered the slaughtered corpse of Big Red. This scene proved too shocking for families and children, and thus was eventually changed to give the attraction a happier ending.

Long before the safari or even Walt Disney World opened, Walt Disney wanted to use real African animals for the river attraction Jungle Cruise at Disneyland. However, due to several reasons, Audio-Animatronics replicas were placed instead.

In July of 2010 it was announced that guests will soon be able to go on “guided treks” around the savannah. This will include areas that are not part of the regular ride experience.